YOUR RIGHTS AS AN AUTHOR 

Our mission at the University of Chicago Press is to disseminate scholarship of the highest standard, to advance scholarly conversation within and across traditional disciplines, and to help define new areas of knowledge and intellectual endeavor. When you publish an article in a journal of the University of Chicago Press or one of its publishing partners, you gain the benefits of working with a professional publishing house that has over a century of commitment to the scholarly enterprise and expertise in both traditional and new electronic channels of scholarly communication. You are assured of reliable, long-term, widespread distribution of your article to a broad audience throughout the world.

We support and encourage authors’ own efforts to promote and disseminate their intellectual works. As an author, you have certain rights to use your article for research, teaching, and scholarly purposes, described briefly here. For a full description of your rights, please see our Guidelines for Journal Authors’ Rights.

Use for Teaching
You may use any version of your article (except proofs) for teaching purposes if you observe these conditions. There is no postpublication embargo on use of the VoR for this purpose. Allowable use includes:

  • making copies for each student, either individually or as part of a printed course pack
  • making the article available through print or electronic reserve or on a learning management platform

Use in Presentations
You may use any version of your article (except proofs) in oral presentations or webinars if you observe these conditions. There is no postpublication embargo on use of the VoR for this purpose. Allowable use includes:

  • making copies for members of the audience
  • including excerpts in shareable presentation slides

Send to Colleagues
You may provide single copies of any version of your article (except proofs) in either print or electronic form to a limited number of your colleagues for the purposes of scholarly discussion if you observe these conditions. There is no postpublication embargo on use of the VoR for this purpose.

Share with News Media
We encourage you to share the published results of your research with the news media. To help you get started, you may wish to view a list of our author resources. Our marketing department can help you or your institution’s news office identify news sources, blogs, and other relevant outlets that may be interested in your research. Before you share your work with the news media, please review these important cautions and conditions.

Republish or Adapt Excerpts or Entire Article
You may republish your article in any subsequent book, article, or other scholarly work of which you are an author or an editor, provided that appropriate credit is given to the journal and you observe these conditions.

Deposit to a Repository or Preprint/Working Paper Service
You may deposit pre- and postacceptance versions of your article to a repository or preprint/working paper service.  Your right to deposit your article in any such service is determined by the version of your article that you post and whether the service is operated in a noncommercial manner. Before you deposit your article, please review this important information about the type of service, conditions that you must observe, Creative Commons licenses, and institutional or funder mandates.

Post on Personal or Departmental Web Page
You may post any version of your article (except proofs) on your personal or departmental web page if you observe these conditions, but we strongly encourage you to post only the CAL and link to the VoR. Strong online usage statistics, which are very important for tracking readership of your paper, play a vital role in identifying where your work may be making its strongest impact—but the ability to gain such data is lost with an easily pirated PDF.

Post on Social Media Platforms
You must observe these conditions when sharing your work on commercial social media or article-sharing platforms including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Academia.edu, and ResearchGate. Except in certain limited circumstances, you may not share the VoR or AAM on such platforms.

For further information, please review these key concepts :
Manuscript version
Prior publication
Concurrent submission
Publication date
Open access or free access
Creative Commons license
Institutional or funder mandate
Repositories and preprint/working paper services

If you have a question that is not addressed here or in the Guidelines for Journal Authors’ Rights, please contact:

Permissions Department

University of Chicago Press, Journals Division

1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

Email: [email protected]

GUIDELINES FOR JOURNAL AUTHORS' RIGHTS

Last updated August 2, 2021

All authors who publish an article in a journal published by The University of Chicago Press have certain rights to use their articles for research, teaching, and scholarly purposes. Your rights are governed by your publication agreement or license and by the provisions of these Guidelines, as in effect at the time of your proposed use of your article. These Guidelines address the questions we hear most often from authors about their rights to reuse their articles. If you have a question that is not addressed here, please contact:

Permissions Department

University of Chicago Press, Journals Division

1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

Email: [email protected]

Key Concepts
Manuscript Version: What you are permitted to do with your manuscript or article depends in part on the version that you intend to use. The versions referred to in these guidelines are defined as follows: 

Author's Original Manuscript (AOM): Any version of the manuscript, such as a working paper, before it is submitted to a journal for consideration for publication. The AOM is a preacceptance version.

Prior publication
: We encourage you to consult the journal’s editor before posting online a paper intended for submission to one of our journals. In some cases, such posting may constitute prior publication—for example, posting a working paper to a venue with a formal review and accreditation process. In addition, posting a paper intended for submission may compromise the confidentiality of the refereeing process if the journal uses an anonymous (blind) peer review system and delay or prevent a decision based on the paper’s merits. You should disclose to the journal editor any prior publication or posting of your manuscript.

Author's Submitted Manuscript (ASM): The version of the manuscript that is submitted to a journal for consideration for publication, prior to editorial (peer) review. The ASM is a preacceptance version.


Concurrent submission
: Submitting the same paper to more than one journal concurrently is a violation of the Press’s ethical standards. Any such manuscript will be rejected. For more information, see the Press’s Statement of Publication Ethics. 


Author's Accepted Manuscript (AAM): The version of the manuscript that is accepted for publication in the journal, after editorial (peer) review and prior to copyediting. All authors must sign a publication agreement or license when the manuscript is accepted, indicating acceptance of the terms in the publication agreement or license and these Guidelines. The AAM is a postacceptance version.

Proofs
: Some journals may provide you with typeset proofs of your article before it is published. Because proofs are under embargo and easily confused with the version of record (VoR—see below), proofs may not be posted, shared, or otherwise used except as directed by the editorial office or the Press.

Version of Record (VoR)
: The published article, regardless of format or medium of publication (e.g., print, PDF, HTML, MOBI, EPUB). Your rights to reuse the VoR depend in part on the format of the VoR that you wish to use and whether the VoR is accessible by subscription only or as open or free access. The VoR is a postacceptance version.

Citation, Abstract, Link (CAL)
: A citation (or reference)—the bibliographic information about the published article, including author(s), title, journal, volume and issue, date of publication, Digital Object Identifier (DOI), URL of the VoR, and the abstract. For journals without an abstract, an author-generated summary or the first page of the published PDF may be used.

Publication Date: The publication date of an article is the date on which the VoR is posted to the journal’s website. Ahead-of-print articles (that is, VoR articles that are posted before release of the issue in which the article appears) are considered to be published. Some journals may post the AAM prior to release of the VoR, usually under the heading Just Accepted; these manuscripts are not considered to be published.

Open Access or Free Access: These terms both refer to free distribution of an article on the internet: making it available for free, with no payment required to read or access the article. We use the term free access when we make an article freely available, either permanently or temporarily, at the direction of the journal’s editor, sponsor, or publisher. We use the term open access when we make an article freely and permanently available at the request of the author. Gold open access means making the VoR freely and permanently available on the journal’s website starting at the time of publication, after payment of a fee (often called an Article Processing or Publication Charge, or APC). Green open access means making a version of the article, usually the AAM and less commonly the VoR, freely and permanently available on a third-party website, such as an institutional repository. There are no author fees for green open access, although certain conditions apply (see Deposit to a Repository or Preprint/Working Paper Service). Our default policy for green open access allows authors to comply with common institutional or funding agency open access mandates.

View more information about open or free access at the Press.

Creative Commons (or equivalent) License: A license that specifies how your article may be used by a third party. View information about the various Creative Commons (CC) licenses

It is important to understand the distinction between copyright, CC licenses, and access, as these concepts are frequently confused. Copyright refers to ownership of a work (including the case of no ownership, or public domain). A CC license placed on a work tells other people how they may use the work. Access refers to the distribution of the work or the way others may gain access to it. Each of these concepts is independent of the others, even if in practice some combinations are more common than others. So, for example, the publication of an article as open access does not mean that the author is the copyright holder (although the author may be). Similarly, an article that is in the public domain, perhaps because the author is an employee of the United States federal government, does not have to be published as open or free access. The application of a CC license to an article does not mean the article is free of copyright, nor does the use of a CC license require that the article be published as open or free access. The CC license does not indicate the copyright status of the article and is not tied to copyright ownership or copyright transfer.

We apply a CC license to any article that is published as gold open access. If you request that the VoR of your article be published as gold open access and that request is approved, the article will normally be made available (after payment of the appropriate fee) under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC 4.0). Under this license, any reuse of the VoR must credit the author and the journal. Commercial reuse requires permission from the Press.

If you wish to publish your article using a different license, you must notify the journal's editor at the time that it is accepted.

Institutional or Funder Mandate: You may be subject to a mandate or prior license from your institution or funder. Such directives may claim certain reuse rights to your work or require you to make some version of your paper available as open access, sometimes under a specific CC license. You will be asked to disclose any such mandates or licenses to the editorial office of the journal prior to signing the publication agreement or license for your manuscript. If the terms of your mandate conflict with the terms described in this policy—if, for example, you are expected to post some version of your paper in an open access repository with a postpublication embargo shorter than 12 months—you should first apply for any available waivers to the mandate.

Repositories and Preprint/Working Paper Services: Both repositories and preprint/working paper services are platforms used for the systematic archiving, retrieval, and delivery of a corpus of scholarly material. This is distinct from a personal, departmental, or social media web page or a third-party commercial article distribution platform such as Academia.edu or ResearchGate. A repository can be used as a site for the deposit of published works (AAM, VoR, CAL), whereas a preprint/working paper service offers a platform for authors or institutions to communicate works in progress (AOM, ASM). Some services may function as both a repository and a preprint or working paper service (such as arXiv or Humanities Commons). A service may be used to highlight a particular institution’s output (such as Harvard University’s DASH repository or The World Bank’s Open Knowledge Repository) or it may be discipline-specific (such as BioArXiv or AgEcon). Repositories and preprint/working paper services may be operated by academic institutions, scholarly societies, government bodies, or businesses. Your right to deposit your article in any such service is determined by the version of your article that you post and whether the service is operated in a noncommercial manner. Noncommercial means the service does not financially benefit from commercial operations (e.g., by charging access fees, by charging fees for the distribution or aggregation of material, by selling advertising, or by selling user data).

Use for Teaching

You may use: AOM, ASM, AAM, VoR, CAL

Do not use: Proofs

You may use any version of your article (except proofs) for teaching purposes. There is no postpublication embargo on use of the VoR for this purpose. Allowable use includes:
  • making copies for each student, either individually or as part of a printed course pack
  • making the article available through print or electronic reserve or on a learning management platform
Conditions:
  • Copies of the article must be used solely for classes you teach, unless you are using the AOM or any version of the article made available under a CC BY license.
  • Classes must be academic and noncommercial in nature (for example, continuing education courses run for certification purposes would require additional permission), unless you are using the AOM or any version of the article made available under a CC BY license.
  • Access to all versions except AOM, open or free access VoR, CAL, or any version of the article made available under a CC BY license must be restricted to registered students.
  • Copies must indicate the copyright holder (shown in the copyright notice at the foot of the article) and any applicable license and include a link to the VoR or the article DOI if available.
  • If you included copyrighted material in your article with permission from the copyright holder, check the permission grant to see whether any restrictions apply to your reuse of the content.
Use in Presentations

You may use: AOM, ASM, AAM, VoR, CAL

Do not use: Proofs

You may use any version of your article (except proofs) in oral presentations or webinars. There is no postpublication embargo on use of the VoR for this purpose. Allowable use includes:
  • making copies for members of the audience
  • including excerpts in shareable presentation slides
Conditions:
  • Access to all versions except AOM, open or free access VoR, CAL, or any version of the article made available under a CC BY license must be restricted to members of the audience.
  • You must indicate the copyright holder (shown in the copyright notice at the foot of the article) and any applicable license and include a link to the VoR or the article DOI if available.
  • If you included copyrighted material in your article with permission from the copyright holder, check the permission grant to see whether any restrictions apply to your reuse of the content
Send to Colleagues

You may use: AOM, ASM, AAM, VoR, CAL

Do not use: Proofs

You may provide single copies of any version of your article (except proofs) in either print or electronic form to a limited number of your colleagues for the purposes of scholarly discussion. There is no postpublication embargo on use of the VoR for this purpose.

Conditions:
  • Copies may not be provided for compensation, except for any version of the article made available under a CC BY license.

  • Copies may not be provided for the purposes of republication or preparing derivative work, except for any version of the article made available under a CC BY license.

  • Copies may not be provided as part of the systematic provision of copyrighted material to a third party, nor to a third party that facilitates large-scale distribution of copyrighted material, except for any version of the article made available under a CC BY license.

  • You must indicate the copyright holder and journal name (shown in the copyright notice at the foot of the article) and any applicable license and include a link to the VoR or the article DOI if available.

  • If you included copyrighted material in your article with permission from the copyright holder, check the permission grant to see whether any restrictions apply to your reuse of the content.

  • Further restrictions apply to use of your article on social media sites such as Academia.edu, ResearchGate, LinkedIn, and Facebook. See Post on Social Media Platforms for more information.

Share with News Media

You may use: AOM, ASM, AAM, VoR, CAL

Do not use: Proofs

We encourage you to share the published results of your research with the news media. To help you get started, you may wish to view our authors resources page.  Our marketing department can help you or your institution’s news office identify news sources, blogs, and other relevant outlets that may be interested in your research.

Authors and their institutions should exercise caution, however, when discussing unpublished work with the news media. You should make clear that the work is preliminary and that the conclusions may change after peer review. You should not solicit media coverage of prepublication manuscripts. Discussion of unpublished research may compromise the confidentiality of the refereeing process if the journal uses an anonymous (blind) peer review system and delay or prevent a decision based on the paper’s merits

Some journals may require you to keep the acceptance of your manuscript confidential prior to publication. A prepublication media embargo may also be imposed. You or your institution’s news office should consult the journal’s editorial office before releasing any information about a manuscript accepted for publication but not yet published. 

Conditions:
  • Full text of postacceptance versions (AAM, VoR) cannot be shared with news media prior to publication.
  • AAM, VoR: cannot be posted on news sites, blogs, or other media outlets without permission of the Press, except for any version available under a CC BY license.
  • You should include a link to the VoR on the journal’s website or the article DOI in your communication with the news media. News reports should not link to prepublication versions of your work or any version available on a site other than the journal’s website.
Republish or Adapt Excerpts or Entire Article
You have the nonexclusive right to republish your article, in whole or in part, in a form identical to the VoR or any previous version or as a new adaptation or derivative, in any subsequent book, article, or other scholarly work of which you are an author or an editor, including your dissertation, provided that appropriate credit is given to the journal as follows:
  • Republication of the VoR without modifications: indicate the copyright holder (shown in the copyright notice at the foot of the article) and any applicable license and include a link to the VoR or the article DOI if available.
  • If the article has not yet been published, include a statement specifying the article’s status, date, and journal name. For example: “Submitted (or Accepted) for publication to (by) Journal Name on MM/DD/YYYY." Include the article DOI if available.
  • Republication of an adaptation or derivative version: include a statement identifying the new work as an adaptation or derivative and crediting the journal as the first instance of publication. Include the copyright holder (shown in the copyright notice at the foot of the article) and any applicable license and include a link to the VoR or the article DOI if available.
Conditions:
  • Some journals have an embargo period after publication of the VoR before the article can appear in another publication. Consult the editorial office.
  • You may republish the VoR or a version substantially the same as it in an open access publication only with permission from the Press and with a CC BY-NC 4.0 license or equivalent, unless the VoR was published under a CC BY license.
  • The author's right of republication does not apply to the author's institution or employer, including when the paper is a work made for hire, unless the VoR was published under a CC BY license. If your institution or funder claims republication rights through a mandate or prior license, and you have requested but not been granted a waiver to that policy, then the institution or funder’s claim is limited to the AOM or ASM except with permission of the Press.
  • If you included copyrighted material in your article with permission from the copyright holder, check the permission grant to see whether any restrictions apply to your reuse of the content. Further permission is often required for republication of such content.
Deposit to a Repository or Preprint/Working Paper Service

You may use: AAM, VoR, CAL (repository); AOM, ASM (preprint/working paper service)

Do not use: Proofs

You may deposit pre- and postacceptance versions of your article to a repository or preprint/working paper service, provided you observe the conditions set out below. Your right to deposit your article in any such service is determined by the version of your article that you post and whether the service is operated in a noncommercial manner.

Third-party article sharing platforms such as Academia.edu and ResearchGate do not qualify as repositories or preprint/working paper services. For conditions on posting to such sites, see Post on Social Media Platforms

Conditions on posting preacceptance versions (AOM, ASM):

  • We urge you to use caution before posting preacceptance versions of your paper to a preprint or working paper service. Posting a paper intended for submission (AOM) may compromise the confidentiality of the refereeing process if the journal uses an anonymous (blind) peer review system and delay or prevent a decision based on the paper’s merits.
  • Posting may constitute prior publication, particularly if the posted version of your paper is assigned a DOI; undergoes editorial or peer review; or is released under the service’s imprimatur (such as a numbered Working Paper series).
  • If the manuscript has been submitted to a journal, you must include a statement specifying the paper’s status, date, and journal name. For example: “Submitted for publication to Journal Name on MM/DD/YYYY.” The statement should be updated with any change in your paper's publication status, unless the journal requires you to keep the acceptance of your manuscript confidential.
  • The working paper should be made available only under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license or equivalent. If an alternate license was used and the working paper cannot be removed from the platform once the VoR is published, you should change the license of the working paper to CC BY-NC 4.0 or equivalent, if possible.
  • You should remove the working paper from the service after your article is published, if possible. If the service acts as a repository for postacceptance works as well as a preprint service, you may replace the working paper with a postacceptance version (AAM, VoR, CAL), provided you observe the conditions below.
  • If you included copyrighted material in your article with permission from the copyright holder, check the permission grant to see whether any restrictions apply to your posting of the content. Further permission may be required, particularly if the manuscript is made available as open access.

Conditions on posting postacceptance versions (AAM, VoR, CAL):

  • Postacceptance versions may be posted to institutional or discipline-specific repositories or services that are operated in a noncommercial manner, meaning the service does not financially benefit from commercial operations (e.g., by charging access fees, by charging fees for the distribution or aggregation of material, by selling advertising, or by selling user data). Most repositories run by academic institutions or government agencies (such as PubMed Central) are acceptable, but many services offered by commercial enterprises (such as SSRN) are not.
  • AAM or subscription or free access VoR: may be placed in the repository upon publication of the VoR with a 12-month postpublication embargo on public availability.
  • Open access VoR or CAL: may be placed in the repository upon publication of the VoR with no embargo on public availability.
  • You must apply for any available waivers from your funding body or institution if they require a prepublication deposit and/or a postpublication embargo of less than 12 months. If a waiver is not granted, you may deposit your article according to the terms of the mandate, but in that case, only the AAM or open access VoR may be deposited.
  • Your article should be made available only under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license or equivalent, except in the following cases:
    • The VoR is published under a different license, in which case you should use that license.
    • Your funding body or institution requires an alternate license such as a CC BY license and you have applied for (if possible) but been denied permission to use a CC BY-NC license. If you make your article available under any license other than a CC BY-NC license, only the AAM may be posted.
  • You must indicate the copyright holder and journal name (usually shown in the copyright notice at the foot of the article) and any applicable license and include a link to the VoR or the article DOI if available.
  • If you included copyrighted material in your article with permission from the copyright holder, check the permission grant to see whether any restrictions apply to your posting of the content. Further permission may be required, particularly if the manuscript in the repository is made available as open access.

Post on Personal or Departmental Web Page

You may use: AOM, ASM, AAM, VoR, CAL

Do not use: Proofs

You may post any version of your article (except proofs) on your personal or departmental web page, but we strongly encourage you to post only the CAL and link to the VoR. Strong online usage statistics, which are very important for tracking readership of your paper, play a vital role in identifying where your work may be making its strongest impact—but the ability to gain such data is lost with an easily pirated PDF.

Conditions:
  • Personal web pages offered through a social media or article-sharing platform do not qualify, except for the AOM, ASM, CAL, or any version of the article made available under a CC BY license. See Post on Social Media Platforms for more information.
  • Preacceptance versions (AOM, ASM) may be posted at any time.  If you post the ASM, include a statement specifying the paper’s status, date, and journal name. For example: “Submitted for publication to Journal Name on MM/DD/YYYY.”
  • AAM: may be posted only upon publication of the VoR. Include a statement specifying the paper’s status, date, and journal name. For example: “Accepted for publication by Journal Name on MM/DD/YYYY.” Include the copyright notice at the foot of the article and a link to the VoR on the journal website or the article DOI.
  • VoR: may be posted only after a postpublication embargo period of 12 months unless the VoR is published as open access or with a CC BY license. Include a link to the VoR on the journal website or the article DOI.
  • If you included copyrighted material in your article with permission from the copyright holder, check the permission grant to see whether any restrictions apply to your posting of the content. Further permission may be required, particularly if the manuscript is made available as open access on your personal or departmental web page.
  • We encourage you to consult the journal's editor before posting the AOM on your personal or departmental web page. Posting a paper intended for submission may compromise the confidentiality of the refereeing process if the journal uses an anonymous (blind) peer review system and delay or prevent a decision based on the paper’s merits.

Post on Social Media Platforms

You may use: AOM, ASM, CAL

Do not use: Proofs, AAM, VoR, except for any version made available under a CC-BY license

You may post only the AOM, ASM, CAL, or any version of the article made available under a CC BY license on social media or article-sharing platforms including, but not limited to, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Academia.edu, and ResearchGate.

Conditions:
  • You may not post the full text of any postacceptance version of your article (AAM, VoR) on social media or article-sharing platforms, except for any version made available under a CC BY license.
  • We encourage you to consult the journal's editor before posting the AOM to such platforms, as posting a paper intended for submission may compromise the confidentiality of the refereeing process if the journal uses an anonymous (blind) peer review system and delay or prevent a decision based on the paper’s merits.